6 Develop a global partnership for development

Where we are?


 

The development aid still accounts for a considerable portion of the GDP of Kosovo

The official development assistance by developed countries continues to be crucial in supporting Kosovo to face its developmental challenges and balance its accounts. Since 1999, the donor community has been heavily involved in developmental and institution building efforts in Kosovo. The development aid still accounts for a considerable portion of the GDP of Kosovo. Access to technology (telephones, computers and internet) is widely available throughout Kosovo, but some remote areas, minority groups, the poor, elders and other vulnerable groups have difficulties to be in possession of technology due to mainly lack of financial, infrastructural or technical capacities. The population in the urban areas has easier access to technology; private sector is more prevalent and focused since the larger portion of the market could be found in populated areas.

Where does Kosovo stand

Although still high, development aid has decreased over years as Kosovo has moved away from post-conflict recovery and into a higher degree of institutional and economic maturity. During the Kosovo Donor Conference 2008 in Brussels, the international community has pledged around $1.2 billion of aid for the period of 2009 – 2013. European Union and the United States remain as the largest donors.

The Directorate for Coordination of Development at the Ministry of European Integration has become operational and is in charge of implementing the coordination of donors as well as promoting an increase of efficiency of aid.  Aid Management Information Platform has been established in 2010, including major donors in Kosovo. A detailed report on donations and ODA will be launched by end of 2010. Additional coordination capacities are needed in order to ensure proper flow of information and a reliable database on aid management. Access to technology has become more prevalent since 2000. There has been an increasing positive trend, especially with mobile telephones, computers and internet. Access to internet has increased from 2% of population in 2003 to 45% in 2009. Similar increase can be seen with computers and mobile telephones.

1.34 years
remaining
until 2015

1990 2015
Targets for MDG8
  1. Develop further an open, rule-based, predictable, non-discriminatory trading and financial system
    • Developing countries gain greater access to the markets of developed countries
    • Least developed countries benefit most from tariff reductions, especially on their agricultural products
  2. Address the special needs of least developed countries
    • Net Official development assistance (ODA), total and to the least developed countries, as percentage of OECD/DAC donors' gross national income
    • Proportion of total bilateral, sector-allocable ODA of OECD/DAC donors to basic social services (basic education, primary health care, nutrition, safe water and sanitation)
    • Proportion of bilateral official development assistance of OECD/DAC donors that is untied
    • Market access
    • Debt sustainability
  3. Address the special needs of landlocked developing countries and small island developing States
    • Official development assistance (ODA) received in landlocked developing countries as a proportion of their gross national income
    • ODA received in small island developing States as a proportion of their gross national incomes
    • Proportion of bilateral official development assistance of OECD/DAC donors that is untied
    • Market access
    • Debt sustainability
  4. Deal comprehensively with the debt problems of developing countries
    • Total number of countries that have reached their HIPC decision points and number that have reached their HIPC completion points (cumulative)
    • Debt relief committed under HIPC and MDRI Initiatives
    • Debt service as a percentage of exports of goods and services
  5. In cooperation with pharmaceutical companies, provide access to affordable essential drugs in developing countries
    • Proportion of population with access to affordable essential drugs on a sustainable basis
  6. In cooperation with the private sector, make available the benefits of new technologies, especially information and communications
    • Telephone lines per 100 population
    • Cellular subscribers per 100 population
    • Internet users per 100 population